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Food For Your Soul

"Madonna of the Goldfinch"

dolci

This oil-on-canvas was executed by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1696-1770), an Italian Rococo painter and printmaker. He was prolific in his production of oils, frescoes and etchings, and his works are owned by many prestigious art museums throughout the world, including Cincinnati Art Museum that owns his portrait, “San Carlo Borromeo.” The original “Madonna of the Goldfinch,” painted about 1761, is at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. It is oil-on-canvas and measures approximately 25 inches by 20 inches.

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, a native of the Republic of Venice, was influenced by his Venetian predecessors, especially Tintoretto and Veronese, as well as by contemporary artists. Successful from the beginning of his career, he has been described as “the greatest decorative painter of 18th-century Europe, as well as its most able craftsman.” Throughout his life he worked not only in Italy, but also in Germany and Spain where he executed large frescoes in palaces and in churches.

Many of Tiepolo’s paintings are bright in color and light-hearted in mood. He used a much cooler palate than previous Venetian painters in order to create a convincing effect of daylight. For a time he was the painter of the Doge in Venice. He also spent several years in Würzburg, Germany, where he executed ceiling paintings in the New Residenz palace of the Prince Bishop. In 1761 King Charles III of Spain commissioned him to create a ceiling fresco to decorate the throne room of the Royal Palace of Madrid. He also painted other ceilings in the palace and carried out many private commissions before his death in Madrid on March 27, 1770.

[Information is from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Battista_Tiepolo 3/21/13]