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9 Schools Served by the Sisters of Charity

While many recognize the considerable impact that the Sisters of Charity have had on Catholic education in Cincinnati, few realize the scope of their presence in Catholic education across the nation. In honor of Catholic Schools Week, we will feature nine schools that have been served by the Sisters of Charity and continue to embrace the SC mission and the core values of Catholic education.

1.

St. William School and Parish (Cincinnati, Ohio)
When considering this school and parish that has welcomed the presence of the Sisters of Charity since 1912, former fifth grade Social Studies teacher S. Marge Farfsing recalls her years at St. William with a joyful heart. She remembers the innate leadership that the faculty and staff possessed: “The faculty created a good community setting and they made sure that they led by example.”


St. William School and Parish continues to instill the value of leadership
in its students today.

2.

St. Vincent Academy (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
Located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, St. Vincent Academy is an academic atmosphere which embodies leadership as well as prayerfulness. The Sisters of Charity have been involved with this community for 86 years and in that time many Sisters have respected the leadership of the faculty and the students, as S. Victoria Marie Forde says: “We were the ones who led the rosary in prayer, we were the ones who made decisions as a class, we were the ones who were the editors of the yearbook, we were the ones who learned how to lead and learned how to embrace everyone in our class—Anglos, Hispanics, everyone.”


Numerous Sisters of Charity from 1883 until 1969 have
inspired leadership among the students of St. Vincent
Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

3.

Seton High School (Cincinnati, Ohio)
S. Judith Metz was not only a History teacher at her alma mater, but she also served as the director of student activities. Sister says that she owes her loyalty to her school because of the tradition of service and leadership that has been preserved since her time there. “We learn through leadership and serve at a multitude of organizations for a variety of people.” This tradition has withstood the test of time since it was founded in 1854 by the Sisters of Charity.


S. Anna Catherine North is one of the many Sisters of Charity that has served
Seton High School since its founding in 1854.

4.

Holy Name School (Cleveland, Ohio)
“[The Sisters of Charity] taught the children to live life well and to be a part of the community; the Sisters did a good job of introducing education to Cleveland and inspiring children to learn,” says S. Marie Patrice Joyce, former principal at Holy Name School. Sister is proud to have been a part of an institution that thrives on helping their students become well-informed citizens through their learning curriculum that has adapted with the Sisters of Charity since 1914.


Holy Name Elementary School in Cleveland, Ohio, has a proud and
active community that has included the Sisters of Charity since 1914.

5.

Divine Redeemer (Colorado Springs, Colorado)
The Sisters of Charity participated in the education of future generations at this institution from 1956 until 1988 and in this time many Sisters, including S. Terry Thorman (1976-1979), recognized the potential for success in their students through active learning. Sisters says, “It was a special challenge to help the students learn and succeed at Divine Redeemer School. We needed to be inclusive so that every student could thrive.”


The Sisters of Charity, including S. Terry Thorman (second from left),
lovingly ministered at Divine Redeemer in Colorado Springs for 32 years.

6.

All Saints Central Elementary (Bay City, Michigan)
Formerly known as “St. James School” when it was established in 1873, All Saints Central Elementary was a place of warmth and welcoming when S. Julie Gatza served as a first grade teacher for 35 years and principal for 15 years. In regards to this year’s theme, she believes that the school best exemplifies service, as she says, “The roundabout service that the students participate in is all encompassing. For over 140 years, the school has operated to make successful young people that serve in their community.”


The Sisters of Charity have been changing lives in the All Saints Central
Elementary community since it was founded in 1873.

7.

Holy Family School (Cincinnati, Ohio)
The Sisters of Charity have been with Holy Family School since 1884 and it has been a place that encourages friendships of all kinds. S. Peggy Rein cherishes Holy Family’s ability to integrate building relationships into the curriculum, which serves to lead and teach the younger students by the example of the older students. She says, “Our faculty is strong and they are concerned about learning just as the students are.”


A school that prides itself on its ability to create personable teacher-student
bonds, the Sisters of Charity have ministered at Holy Family School in
Cincinnati since 1884.

8.

St. Albert the Great School (Dayton, Ohio)
St. Albert the Great School in Kettering, Ohio, and the Sisters of Charity who ministered there for more than 50 years, equipped their students with the necessary tools for success since founded in 1949. As retired primary teacher and coordinator of primary grades S. Patrice Vales says, “Being a teacher isn’t so much covering the material, but injecting principles of love and learning so they can succeed as people. That’s something that this school did very well.”


The faculty and staff of St. Albert the Great School in
Kettering, Ohio, have inspired the success of their students
since 1949.

9.

Cathedral School (Denver, Colorado)
S. Jackie Leech referred to Cathedral School, a school that many Sisters of Charity ministered at in their 91 years there, as a “melting pot” because of the diversity of culture and thought, which enhanced the learning experience of the students and naturally adhered to each part of this year’s theme. “It was a happy school where the students got along, teachers were liked, learning took place and our values were formed which took us into the future to lead, serve, learn and succeed,” she says.


The Sisters of Charity ministered at Cathedral School in Denver, Colorado, from
1891 until 1982.